An abundance of tracheotomies in some parts

What a change it was from receiving hundreds of responses about the Light Horse Interchange poles early last week to just the one about the poles at Eridge Park (C8). Val Keys of Moss Vale has driven past these poles thousands of times and remembers when they were placed there. “The poles are called ‘Winds of Change’ and were commissioned as a public artwork by Wingecarribee Shire Council to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the townships of Moss Vale and Bowral. They were unveiled on 16th May 2013.” If you want more details about the artist and what the leaf on each pole represents, Val suggests the WSC website.

“I never realised how many Eastern Suburbanites have had tracheotomies until I noticed so many masks worn under chins,” observes Andrew Taubman of Queens Park. “Bravo, people!”

“In the late ’70s, as a 17-year-old in the Commonwealth Bank in Blacktown, I was issued a handgun (C8) and a large sum of money to walk the kilometre or so to the sub-branch at Westpoint,” writes Steve Mathews of Norfolk Island. “Before that day, I had never seen a gun. The consensus at a later staff training on handguns was that my best option would have been to throw the gun at any would-be robber, hoping to knock them out.”

More tales of teenaged bank tellers and guns (C8). Barry Riley of Woy Woy remembers that as “a teenaged Commonwealth Bank clerk in the ’60s, I often ferried cash to city branches that had run out. The gun they gave me for protection was useless since with heavy rolls of coin in one pocket and the gun in the other I needed both hands to hold my trousers up”.

In response to Richard Shields of Beecroft, David Mason of Scarborough writes that a number of years ago he “lived relatively close to the Bellambi Bowling Club, obviously in the Circumference of Consumption (C8). I came to the conclusion that my house was the ideal walking distance from the club, enabling the average punter to often discard their empty takeaway stubbie into my front yard”.

How to tell if you are old? Joan Brown of Orange has a theory. “Being able to remember when a warning had to be issued by the makers of TV sets about not putting a vase of flowers on top of the set, in case it toppled over and the water played havoc with the electronics.”

Column8@smh.com.au

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