Australia news live update: Albanese calls Roe vs Wade rollback ‘a setback for women’; activists block Sydney Harbour tunnel

Albanese says Roe vs Wade decision in the US is ‘a setback for women’

Daniel Hurst

The prime minister, Anthony Albanese, says the US supreme court’s decision to overturn abortion rights “is a setback for women and their right to control their own bodies and their lives”.

Albanese had spoken to reporters about the decision before flying out of Australia last night. But his comments to the ABC’s AM program this morning were slightly stronger in describing the implications of the US supreme court’s decision:

Well, people are entitled to their own views, but not to impose their views on women for whom this is a deeply personal decision. That is, in my view, one for an individual woman to make based upon their own circumstances, including the health implications.

This decision has caused enormous distress. And it is a setback for women and their right to control their own bodies and their lives in the United States. It is a good thing that in Australia, this is not a matter for partisan political debate.

An abortion rights supporter demonstrates by holding a coat hanger outside the US supreme court.
An abortion rights supporter demonstrates by holding a coat hanger outside the US supreme court. Photograph: Elizabeth Frantz/Reuters

Why does a teacher shortage occur?

Gabbie Stroud, teacher and author, says it’s because our education system is operating “under a business model which treats students and parents as customers, and teachers as expendable workers expected to function as told, rather than as autonomous professionals tasked with the unique and complex responsibility of guiding young people’s learning.”

Stroud spoke to numerous teachers leaving the profession amid Australia’s teacher shortage, who say their skills are “not respected or valued”, the expectations were destroying them, and the lack of trust and compounding stress made their jobs untenable.

Read the full story here:

Albanese says Roe vs Wade decision in the US is ‘a setback for women’

Daniel Hurst

Daniel Hurst

The prime minister, Anthony Albanese, says the US supreme court’s decision to overturn abortion rights “is a setback for women and their right to control their own bodies and their lives”.

Albanese had spoken to reporters about the decision before flying out of Australia last night. But his comments to the ABC’s AM program this morning were slightly stronger in describing the implications of the US supreme court’s decision:

Well, people are entitled to their own views, but not to impose their views on women for whom this is a deeply personal decision. That is, in my view, one for an individual woman to make based upon their own circumstances, including the health implications.

This decision has caused enormous distress. And it is a setback for women and their right to control their own bodies and their lives in the United States. It is a good thing that in Australia, this is not a matter for partisan political debate.

An abortion rights supporter demonstrates by holding a coat hanger outside the US supreme court.
An abortion rights supporter demonstrates by holding a coat hanger outside the US supreme court. Photograph: Elizabeth Frantz/Reuters

Disruption is ‘essential in cutting through climate denial’, activists say

More on the climate protests happening in Sydney today: AAP are reporting that about 50 masked protesters marched north down Kent Street towards the harbour after moving through the city, beginning at Elizabeth Street, between Park and Bathurst streets.

Blockade Australia protests have previously shut down Port Botany, the Harbour Bridge and Spit bridge.

The Transport Management Centre says the Sydney Harbour Tunnel is closed at the tunnel entrance in North Sydney, after a protester parked a car, blocking access.

Blockade Australia livestreamed a video of the young woman in her car blocking the tunnel, claiming she was from the northern NSW town of Lismore, which was subject to extreme and repeated flooding earlier this year, and is still recovering.

All traffic is being diverted via the Sydney Harbour Bridge and traffic is backed up for several kilometres.

Blockade Australia said they would continue to cause disruptions in the days ahead:

Disruption to the infrastructure of Australia’s project of exploitation is essential in cutting through the climate denial that this system survives off.

Earlier this year, the NSW government arrested climate crisis activists blocking traffic and access to ports. Protesters now face a maximum penalty of two years’ jail and $22,000 fines for disrupting traffic or preventing access on roads.

The roads and crimes legislation amendment bill, passed earlier this year, created new offences targeting activists who block access to major facilities including ports and railways.

Daniel Hurst

Daniel Hurst

Albanese to have discussions about Ukraine at Nato summit

The prime minister, Anthony Albanese, is not speculating about what further assistance Australia may offer Ukraine – but says he will have discussions with Australia’s friends at the Nato summit in Madrid this week.

He told the ABC’s AM program it was significant that Australia, South Korea, Japan and New Zealand were invited:

This is an important time in international politics. We have Russia’s invasion of Ukraine; this brutal invasion is against the rule of law – it’s an attack on the sovereignty of the people of Ukraine. It’s important that democratic nations stand side by side with the government and people of Ukraine.

Asked to describe the implications for Australia if President Vladimir Putin prevails in Ukraine, Albanese said:

Well, the implications are not just for Australia, but for all of those who cherish democracy, who cherish the rule of law, and who cherish the rights of nations to be sovereign, are extreme. We know that there is an alliance that has been reached as well between Russia and China.

There are implications for our region, given the strategic competition that is in our region, which is why this Nato summit comes at such a critical time and why I look forward to the discussions that I’ll have both in the formal proceedings at the Nato summit, but also in the bilateral meetings I’ll have with our democratic friends, including Prime Minister [Boris] Johnson, but also Justin Trudeau and other democratic leaders.

Lane asked about Afghanistan – which last week suffered an earthquake that killed more than 1,000 people and left many people homeless amid a broader humanitarian crisis – and whether the government’s announcement of an extra $1m in aid was enough.

Albanese replied:

Well, we’ve provided support that we see as being appropriate. And we certainly feel for the people of Afghanistan who are going through this difficult time at the same time as, of course, with the change that has occurred in regimes there has caused further hardship.

NSW records 11 deaths from Covid-19 with 1,507 people in hospital

There were 6,862 new cases recorded in the state over the 24 hour reporting period, with 55 people in intensive care.

COVID-19 update – Monday 27 June 2022

In the 24-hour reporting period to 4pm yesterday:

– 96.6% of people aged 16+ have had one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine
– 95.1% of people aged 16+ have had two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine pic.twitter.com/BIgJ6SBqPc

— NSW Health (@NSWHealth) June 26, 2022

Victoria reports one Covid-19 death with 459 people in hospital

The state has recorded 6,305 new cases in the last 24 hours. There were 26 people in intensive care and 10 on ventilators.

Climate activists block Sydney streets including the Harbour Tunnel

Climate activists have blocked the Harbour Tunnel in Sydney among other streets in the city centre as part of a “week of resistance” against climate inaction.

The activists, from group Blockade Australia, moved from Hyde Park at 8am this morning across the CBD towards the harbour and have reportedly blocked multiple roads.

About 8.30am (27/06/22), police were called to the Sydney Harbour Tunnel, following reports a woman had locked herself to a vehicle blocking citybound lanes of the causing significant disruptions. She has been arrested and the vehicle is in the process of being removed.

— NSW Police Force (@nswpolice) June 26, 2022

Last week, activists from the group said they wanted to “blockade the streets of Australia’s most important political and economic centre and cause disruption that cannot be ignored”.

The NSW parliament passed controversial anti-protest laws in April widely understood as intended to stymie climate protest.

Seven Blockade Australia activists were charged a week ago after an extraordinary incident in the Colo Valley involving undercover police officers.

Daniel Hurst

Daniel Hurst

Albanese responds to crossbench backlash

Returning to that interview with the prime minister, Anthony Albanese, on the ABC’s AM program:

ABC’s Sabra Lane asked him about criticism of the cuts to crossbenchers’ staff allocations. Asked whether the move was dismissive and arrogant, Albanese said:

Well, what is not fair is the idea that Zali Steggall’s electorate should have double the representation in terms of staff of electorates in the same region. And the fact is that the eight staff that were allocated to the crossbench is more than senior frontbenchers had in opposition.

Up until 2017 the crossbenchers had one additional staffer for House of Representatives staff members. This is something that was increased to three in 2017 and then was further increased in 2019 at the same time as there were changes in the composition of the parliament with some defections from the Liberal party.

Despite the current backlash, Albanese sought to emphasise his interest in constructive relationship with the crossbench:

I’ve had discussions with crossbenchers. I’ve rung all of them after the election and I have rung everyone back who wanted to discuss these issues. There are some misconceptions there.

Literary community pays tribute to Frank Moorhouse

The Australian literary community is paying tribute to the writer Frank Moorhouse, who died on Sunday, aged 83.

His publisher at Penguin Random House, Meredith Curnow, said in a statement to Nine Newspapers:

Renowned for his use of the discontinuous narrative in works such as The Americans, Baby and Forty-Seventeen, Frank Moorhouse has been an active participant in Australian literature for nearly 50 years.

The Edith Trilogy, made up of the astounding novels Grand Days, Dark Palace and Cold Light have not only brought immense pleasure to so many readers, but have also affected the career paths of many women. I feel so privileged to have worked with Frank on Cold Light.

One of the reasons I will forever adore Frank Moorhouse is his generosity toward new writers and people working in publishing. He loved to sit and learn from younger people and to share his immense wisdom and incredible stories. We will all miss him very much.

Author Frank Moorhouse.
Author Frank Moorhouse has died aged 83. Photograph: Margaret Scheikpwsli/AAP

Vale Frank Moorhouse. What a terrific writer. I studied his deft, savage, short fiction at UTS, full of rich bohemians and awful men. So well observed and always so funny. Really loved The Americans, Baby and Futility and other animals. Vale

— B E Ayshford (@episode2480) June 26, 2022

Donna Lu

Donna Lu

Frogs that lay eggs on land – new WA genus named after teacher whose lab was a campervan

Four frog species in Western Australia that lay their eggs on land have been identified as a new genus and named after a retired high school music teacher-turned-scientist.

Researchers have classified the frogs into the distinct biological group Anstisia. Their tadpoles develop entirely on land and never contact the water of a creek or pond before becoming adults. Instead, they swim around in a jelly-like pool created by laid eggs and are nourished by yolk reserves.

The genus has been named in honour of Marion Anstis, who worked as a high school teacher for 31 years before cataloguing virtually all known frog species on the Australian continent.

Grant Webster at the University of New England, one of two scientists who classified the genus, said Anstisia was the first frog genus in Australia to be named after a person:

It does happen a lot in plants – like Banksia, for example, after [Joseph] Banks.

Usually, a frog scientist of such prestige and contribution will get a frog [species] named after them eventually. [Marion Anstis] never had anything named after her.

Read the full story about this remarkable woman (and the frogs!) here:

Anthony Albanese defends crossbench staff cuts as David Pocock warns of ‘unfair playing field’

Anthony Albanese commented this morning about the parliamentary staff cuts for crossbench MPs. He told ABC radio:

They’re not totally on their own … They have access to the parliamentary library that we will be increasing support for, they have access to clerks that draft legislation in addition to personal staff …

At the same time as [the Morrison government] were cutting Centrelink staff, people can’t get passports, visas can’t get processed, the only area of public service that saw an increase in staffing levels appears to have been parliamentary staff.

He said there had been “misconceptions” about the job of electoral office staff, who often did parliamentary work.

Also speaking on ABC RN, independent ACT senator David Pocock accused the prime minister of making the decision to gain political advantage:

Cutting back on our small teams creates an unfair playing field which disadvantages our communities and our capacity to actually advocate on their behalf.

It could be incredibly hard to actually be across legislation and if I don’t understand things it’s going to be very hard to actually vote on them.

… I want to be constructive, to represent a community I love. I’m certainly not going to just vote against things to make a point, that’s not how I do things.

Independent senator David Pocock.
Independent senator David Pocock. Photograph: Mick Tsikas/AAP

Victoria: it’s cold! It’s getting colder!

🥶Cold this morning? More places (esp across the N of Victoria) are expected to drop below zero tomorrow.

This morning…
Hopetoun Airport -1.8°C @ 7:33am
Redesdale -1.8°C @ 7:17am
Ballarat Airport -0.5°C @ 6:58am
Horsham -0.1°C @ 5:30am#VicWeather: https://t.co/BQEpwrEDgw

— Bureau of Meteorology, Victoria (@BOM_Vic) June 26, 2022

It’s not warm in NSW either:

Current temperatures across #NSW, the chance of frost about the ranges and southern inland. That area of frost is expected to increase tomorrow and include on and west of the ranges. Chance of showers along the coast and possibly southern ranges today. See:https://t.co/SPHgGeisGZ pic.twitter.com/sCTUgdjOxZ

— Bureau of Meteorology, New South Wales (@BOM_NSW) June 26, 2022

Eden Gillespie

Eden Gillespie

Australian Muslim group lodges complaint against Twitter for failing to remove ‘hateful’ content

An advocacy group for Australian Muslims has lodged a complaint against Twitter with the Queensland Human Rights Commission, accusing the site of failing to take action against accounts that incite hatred on the platform.

The Australian Muslim Advocacy Network (Aman) argues that, as a publisher, Twitter is responsible for content posted by a far-right account that has been cited in the manifesto of the extremist who killed 77 people in Norway in 2011.

The network says despite multiple requests, Twitter has refused to delete the account and replies to its posts that “vilify” Muslim. The network has accused Twitter under Queensland’s Anti-Discrimination Act of inciting hatred as a publisher of third-party accounts, as well as discrimination for refusing to take action against hateful content.

Its complaint also says Twitter has engaged in indirect discrimination by failing to apply Australian standards to content on its platform.

Read the full story here:

Movement of bee hives and products in NSW banned amid biosecurity concerns

An emergency biosecurity zone has been imposed to stop the movement of bees across NSW after the parasite varroa mite was discovered for the first time in Australia, AAP reports.

Agriculture minister Dugald Saunders issued the order on Sunday, saying no bees will be allowed to be moved across NSW:

Australia is the only major honey-producing country free from varroa mite, the most serious pest to honey bees worldwide.

The tiny reddish-brown parasites have the potential to devastate an industry that’s worth $70m annually by spreading viruses that cripple bees’ ability to fly, gather food and pollinate crops.

Varroa mite was detected at the Port of Newcastle on Friday by the state Department of Primary Industries, which is now investigating potentially contaminated hives outside an initial 50km biosecurity zone.

A property near Trangie in central western NSW will be inspected and containment and control activities will be carried out on Monday after hives near the Port of Newcastle were recently sent there.

Saunders said:

If varroa mite settles in the state, it will have severe consequences, so we’re taking every precaution and action needed to contain the parasite and protect the local honey industry and pollination.

We’re working with apiary industry bodies and stakeholders to ensure beekeepers are well informed and can continue to help us with this critical response.

The 50km biosecurity zone in place around the Port of Newcastle means beekeepers within the area must notify the department of the locations of their hives.

A 25km surveillance zone is active around the site and officials are monitoring and inspecting managed and feral honey bees.

A 10km emergency zone around the port remains in place, with hives in that area to be eradicated.

Varoa mite was detected at the Port of Newcastle on Friday, prompting NSW to issue an emergency order to restrict bee movements.
Varoa mite was detected at the Port of Newcastle on Friday, prompting NSW to issue an emergency order to restrict bee movements. Photograph: Ellen Smith/The Guardian

Josh Taylor

Josh Taylor

Melbourne startup raises $9m for mental wellness game based on tending houseplants

A Melbourne games startup has raised $9m in funding while developing a mobile game aimed at mental wellness that doesn’t try to keep you on for hours a day, in what is said to be the largest venture capital seed investment for a game studio founded by women in Australia.

Lumi Interactive has been developing Kinder World since 2020.

The premise of a mobile game of houseplant maintenance within a community focused on mental wellbeing was conceived during the six pandemic lockdowns in Melbourne between 2020 and 2021. Co-founder Lauren Clinnick said during the lockdowns, random acts of kindness made the world a better place.

Read the full story:

A little bit of background on that: under the previous Coalition government, crossbench MPs and senators were allowed to have two advisers and two assistant advisers. Crossbench MPs and senators have now been told they can only have one senior adviser, alongside their four electoral office staff.

Monique Ryan, the teal independent who knocked Josh Frydenberg out of Kooyong, said over the weekend:

After coming to power, Prime Minister Albanese stated that he wanted to work cooperatively with crossbench MPs to ensure they were able to contribute fully to the parliament’s deliberations and operations. It’s disappointing that his first act towards the crossbench is utterly at odds with that statement.

Kooyong independent Monique Ryan.
Independent member for Kooyong, Monique Ryan. Photograph: Sam Tabone/Getty Images

Labor’s Katy Gallagher defends crossbench staffing cuts

Finance minister Katy Gallagher has just been speaking on ABC RN about the parliamentary staffing cut:

The prime minister isn’t trying to put anyone offside … Boosting the parliamentary library is a fairer way to deal with this resource allocation. We’re open to constructive discussion with the crossbench … but we also need to be sustainable.

RN Breakfast host Patricia Karvelas puts it to her that they are in a very different situation to the major parties, which have significantly more collective resources, and “the machinery of government” behind them.

Gallagher says increasing resources to the parliamentary library is a “fairer” way of doing it.

We are having ongoing and constructive engagement with [the crossbenchers] and we will continue that.

People of Australia have voted for this parliament, it’s up to this parliament to make that work … Everyone is taking a hit here because we’re trying to make it fairer and more sustainable across the parliament.

Minister for finance, Katy Gallagher.
Minister for finance, Katy Gallagher. Photograph: Mick Tsikas/AAP

Good morning

Good morning folks, welcome to yet another Monday.

The prime minister, Anthony Albanese, is on his way to Europe today, arriving in Madrid this afternoon for the Nato summit, which will focus on talks about the war in Ukraine and further sanctions on Russia. Albanese will be joined by leaders from New Zealand, South Korea and Japan among others.

He’s expected to meet with UK PM Boris Johnson and US president Joe Biden during the trip. Albanese said prior to departure that he was still taking “security advice” on whether it was safe to visit Ukraine president Volodymyr Zelenskiy in Kyiv.

Back at home, independent members of the new federal parliament, Monique Ryan, David Pocock, Zali Steggall and Jacqui Lambie have criticised Albanese’s decision to cut the number of parliamentary staff crossbench MPs and senators can hire from four to one senior adviser, alongside their four electoral office staff, saying it will hamper their ability to properly scrutinise legislation.

Victorian premier Daniel Andrews’ new cabinet will be sworn in today after the Labor government was forced into a swift cabinet reshuffle five months out from the November state election. Deputy premier James Merlino, health minister Martin Foley, jobs minister Martin Pakula and police minister Lisa Neville all stepped down from cabinet on Friday, along with retiring planning minister Richard Wynne, prompting the reshuffle.

Andrews’ new frontbench was revealed on Saturday, with Jacinta Allan crowned deputy premier. Sonya Kilkenny, Lizzie Blandthorn, Steve Dimopoulos, Harriet Shing and Colin Brooks will be sworn in at Government House on today.

And the movement of bees across NSW has been banned under an emergency order to stop the spread of the varroa mite, after an infestation was detected at the Port of Newcastle on Friday. The mite can be devastating for hives and crops.

I’ll be with you until lunchtime today. If you see something you reckon I ought to take a look at, you can find me on Twitter @gingerandhoney or send me an email at stephanie.convery@theguardian.com. Got a coffee? Let’s get into it.



Source link

Latest

Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav: 1 Crore Students Sing Patriotic Songs, Set World Record in Rajasthan

Last Updated: August 13, 2022, 08:15 ISTAzadi Ka Amrit...

Parents arrested, tased while trying to get onto campus of Arizona school on lockdown

Three parents were arrested, two of whom were tased,...

Mississippi Trooper Cleared In Probe of Chokehold of Black Man

JACKSON, Miss (AP) — The Mississippi Department of Public...

Couple supplying explosives to heist gangs, illegal miners nabbed

A couple behind supplying explosives to cash-in-transit heist gangs...

Australia news live: Nationals discuss nuclear power and jobs summit, monkeypox vaccinations start

Key eventsShow key events onlyPlease turn on JavaScript to use this featureGood morningWelcome to another Saturday edition of the live news blog.I’m coming at...

UK decision not to buy Covid drug Evusheld disappoints charities

The UK will not buy the drug Evusheld, which can help prevent Covid infections in people with weakened immune systems, the government has said.The...

‘Energy bills have overtaken wages’: 280-year-old pub at risk of closure

When the Faulkland Inn first opened its doors, George II was on the throne and Britain was at war with Spain. Since then, the...