Best close-up of universe’s most massive star reveals it might be smaller than thought

The universe’s most massive known star just got its best ever close-up, and it reveals the star might be smaller than astronomers previously thought.

Astronomers using the Gemini South telescope in Chile photographed the star R136a1, which is located about 160,000 light-years from Earth in the center of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud — a dwarf companion galaxy of the Milky Way. Their observations show that the giant star (and others like it) may not be as massive as previously thought. 

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