Queen’s speech proposals show Johnson ‘bereft of ideas or purpose’, says Starmer – live

Starmer says Queen’s speech shows government is ‘bereft of ideas’

Starmer says Britain can do more than just “get Brexit done”.

But the country needs more than what this government is offering.

He says the Queen’s speech was “thin” and “bereft of ideas or purpose, without a guiding principle, or a roadmap for delivery”.

He says he would like to think the worst is over.

But the country is “staring down the barrel of something we haven’t seen in decades – a stagflation crisis [rising inflation and rising unemployment].”

The government should be introducing a windfall tax, he says.

Johnson says he and chancellor to say more about help for people with cost of living ‘in the days to come’

Johnson says the UK had the fastest growth in the G7 last year, and will return to that next year. That will give the government the “fiscal firepower” to help families with the pressures they face.

The government will continue to use “all our ingenuity and compassion for as long as it takes” to help people, he says. He says “the chancellor and I will be saying more about this in the days to come”.

(It is not clear from this whether, by “in the days to come”, Johnson literally means in the days to come, or whether he means at some point before the autumn. Until recently the government has been signalling that the next big announcment about help for people with the cost of living will not come until late summer, when the government has a better sense of what will happen to energy prices in the autumn.)

Boris Johnson is speaking now. He says we come to the “halfway point of this parliament” – quashing speculation that an early election might be on the cards.

After some broadbrush claims about the government, he pays tribute to MPs who have died, David Amess, James Brokenshire and Jack Dromey.

Starmer has finished. It was rather a poor speech, that got worse and worse as it went along.

One mistake was to structure it around a slogan – “government of the moment” – that will mean little to many people.

This is from Jim Pickard from the Financial Times.

quite a glum speech from Keir Starmer right now, Labour MPs almost silent behind him

— Jim Pickard (@PickardJE) May 10, 2022

And this is from Paul Waugh from the i.

“A government of the moment would say ‘enough is enough..” Starmer says.
Cue ironic jeers from Tory MPs.

Labour MPs not doing much to help their leader out here.
Rare and lukewarm cheers for their man

— Paul Waugh (@paulwaugh) May 10, 2022

Starmer says UK needs ‘government of the moment’

Starmer says the country needs a “government of the moment”.

A government at the moment would have grasped the nettle and set up a new approach to the economy. An approach based on a stronger partnership between governments and businesses, a partnership dedicated to grow.

A government of the moment would finally abolish business rates and replace them with a system that creates a level playing field with online giants so that our businesses can compete …

And a government at the moment would have a plan to revive our town centres and new businesses, providing finance for a new generation.

Starmer says the UK is forecast to have the slowest growth in the G7 next yaer.

It used to have growth of 2 or 2.5% every year.

If the government had matched the Labour record on growth, people would be richer, and the government would have an extra £40bn for public services, he says.

Starmer says Queen’s speech shows government is ‘bereft of ideas’

Starmer says Britain can do more than just “get Brexit done”.

But the country needs more than what this government is offering.

He says the Queen’s speech was “thin” and “bereft of ideas or purpose, without a guiding principle, or a roadmap for delivery”.

He says he would like to think the worst is over.

But the country is “staring down the barrel of something we haven’t seen in decades – a stagflation crisis [rising inflation and rising unemployment].”

The government should be introducing a windfall tax, he says.

Keir Starmer is speaking. He starts with a warm tribute to the Queen.

And he congatulates the prime minister too. He has achieved a first, he says.

It sounds as if Starmer is going to launch into Partygate – but instead Starmer says Johnson is the resident of 10 Downing Street to be represented by a Labour council (after Labour took Westminster council last week). Starmer says he hopes the council will serve Johnson well.

Back in the Commons, Fay Jones is winding up. Keir Starmer is speaking next. They are all grateful he has not cancelled that speech, she says, referring to Starmer’s no-show at the Institute for Government yesterday.

Animal welfare organisations say they are “deeply dismayed” by the government’s failure to pursue laws banning imports of foie gras and fur, PA Media reports. PA says:

The Queen’s speech did not include an animals abroad bill to ban the imports of such products, as well as halt adverts for tourism practices abroad such as elephant riding.

A coalition of 38 organisations, including the RSPCA, Compassion in World Farming, Four Paws UK, Humane Society International and Save the Asian Elephants, said the failure to bring forward the bill was a betrayal of animals and out of step with public opinion.

Charities have criticised the Queen’s speech for its lack of action on the cost of living crisis.

Dan Paskins, director of UK impact at Save the Children, said:

The cost-of-living crisis is an emergency the UK Government should be dealing with right now. The Queen’s Speech was a major opportunity to support those most affected by rising costs and the Government didn’t take it.

Alison Garnham, chief executive of the Child Poverty Action Group, said:

Government offered no short-term comfort for parents struggling to feed their kids in the face of rocketing prices, and no long-term vision for ending child poverty.

Fay Jones is now telling a story about wearing a “It’s DD for me” T-shirt when supporting David Davis’s leadership bid in 2005.

When she stood as a candidate, and was asked if she had done anything to embarrass the party, she felt she had to mention this, she says. Had she learnt anything from it? That she did not look good in pink, she says.

Fay Jones (Con) is speaking now, seconding the humble address. She starts with a series of self-deprecating stories about colleagues commenting on her joke-delivering abilities.

Back in the Commons Graham Stuart is still speaking. He says that he used to tell David Cameron what he thought of how he was doing – which led to his never getting promoted to the front bench during his first 11 years in parliament.

It changed when Therea May became PM, he says. It may have been because she saw merit in him, she says, but more likely it was because she had not seen very much of him.



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