Space debris is coming down more frequently. What are the chances it could hit someone or damage property?

A piece of presumed space debris sits upright in a field in Australia. (Image credit: Brad Tucker, Author provided)

This article was originally published at The Conversation. (opens in new tab) The publication contributed the article to Space.com’s Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights.

Fabian Zander (opens in new tab), Senior Research Fellow in Aerospace Engineering, University of Southern Queensland



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